• Stage Directions
     
    Backstage
     
    Up Right Up Center Up Left
    Stage Right Center Stage Stage Left
    Down Right Down Center Down Left
     
    Audience
     
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    Theatre Vocabulary
     
     
     
    Actor/Actress

    Printed words, including dialogue and the 
    stage directions for a script.

    Antagonist

    A person or a situation that opposes 
    another character’s goals or desires.

    Articulation

    The clear and precise pronunciation of words.

    Blocking
    The planning and working out of the 
    movements of actors on stage.
    Center Stage

    The center of the area defined as the stage.

    Character

    A personality or role an actor/actress re-creates.

    Characterization

    The development and portrayal of a personality through thought, action, dialogue, costuming, and makeup.

    Climax

    The point of greatest dramatic tension or transition in a theatrical work.

    Cold Reading

    A reading of a script done by actors who have not previously reviewed the play.

    Collaboration

    Two or more people working together in a joint intellectual effort.

    Conflict

    Opposition of persons or forces giving rise to dramatic action.

    Context

    Interrelated conditions in which a play exists or occurs.

    Costume

    Clothing worn by an actor on stage during a performance.

    Critique

    Opinions and comments based on predetermined criteria that may be used for self- evaluation or the evaluation of the actors or the production itself.

    Cue

    A signal, either verbal or physical, that indicates something else, such as a line of dialogue or an entrance, is to happen.

    Dialogue

    The conversation between actors on stage.

    Directing

    The art and technique of bringing the elements of theatre together to make a play.

    Director

    The person who oversees the entire process of staging a production.

    Downstage

    The stage area toward the audience.

    Exposition

    Detailed information revealing the facts of a plot.

    Gesture

    An expressive movement of the body or limbs.

    Improvisation

    A spontaneous style of theatre through which scenes are created without advance rehearsal or a script.

    Monologue

    A long speech by a single character.

    Motivation

    A character’s reason for doing or saying things in a play.

    Objective

    A character’s goal or intention

    Pacing

    The tempo of an entire theatrical performance.

    Pantomime

    Acting without words through facial expression, 
    gesture, and movement.

    Pitch

    The highness or lowness of voice

    Play

    The stage representation of an action or a story; 
    a dramatic composition.

    Playwright

    A person who writes plays.

    Projection

    The placement and delivery of volume, clarity, and distinctness of voice for communicating to an audience.

    Props

    Items carried on stage by an actor; small items 
    on the set used by the actors.

    Proscenium

    The view of the stage for the audience; also called a proscenium arch. The archway is in a sense the frame for stage as defined by the boundaries of the stage beyond which a viewer cannot see.

    Protagonist

    The main character of a play and the character with whom the audience identifies most strongly.

    Rehearsal

    Practice sessions in which the actors and technicians prepare for public performance through repetition.

    Rising Action

    The part of a plot consisting of complications and discoveries that create conflict.

    Run-Through

    A rehearsal moving from start to finish without stopping for corrections or notes.

    Script

    The written text of a play.

    Stage

    The area where actors perform.

    Stage Left

    The left side of the stage from the perspective of an actor facing the audience.

    Stage Right

    The right side of the stage from the perspective of an actor facing the audience.

    Subtext

    Information that is implied by a character but not stated by a character in dialogue, including actions and thoughts.

    Tableau

    A silent and motionless depiction of a scene created by actors, often from a picture.

    Text

    Printed words, including dialogue and the stage directions for a script.

    Vocal Quality

    The characteristics of a voice, such as shrill, nasal, 
    raspy, breathy, booming, and so forth.

    Volume

    The degree of loudness or intensity of a voice.