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    Here are some great activities to practice language skills at home.

    • Read to your child.
    • Talk to your child about the environment around you.
    • Encourage your child to tell you about his/her day. Ask for details.
    • Go to the library. As your child reads each book, ask questions like “Who is the main character?” “What do you like about this story?” “How do you think it will end?” “What was your favorite part?”
    • Compare and contrast objects or pictures. For example, it your child has two stuffed bears, talk about how the bears are the same and how they are different.
    • Have your child keep a story journal to share with your family. If your child cannot yet write, have him/her draw pictures to tell stories.
    • Play a board game! Playing games will encourage social skills like turn taking, being a good sport, and topic maintenance.
    • Practice spatial concepts by asking your child to identify body parts. For example, “Where is your nose?” When your child points to their nose, follow up with different concept phrases like, “Your nose is on your face,” “Your nose is above your lips,” or “Your nose is on the front of your head.”
    • I See is a great game to practice spatial concepts. For example, “I see a book. Where is it?” When your child finds or points to it, you respond with, “The book is on the shelf…in the book bag… under the table… by the bed… above the table… beside the chair.”
    • Play I Spy in order to practice description words. For example, “I spy a big, blue book,” “I spy a little, square pillow,” “I spy a purple toy with round wheels.”
    • Try playing a barrier game. In a barrier game, two players sit across from each other with a barrier (such as a folder) between them. Each player has duplicate scenes and objects. Place the barrier so that each player is unable to see the other player’s scene and objects. One player chooses where to put each object on his/her scene. The opposing player then gives verbal directions to help the other player set up his/her scene exactly the same way. Once the players feel like their scenes match, compare the scenes.
    • Try this great barrier game. One player describes a picture in front of him/her while the other tries to duplicate it.
    • If your child stutters, try to slow down the pace of conversations.
    • Ask your child questions about photographs, illustrations, or actual objects. They can use these visual cues to answer the question.
      Make your own book. Have your child illustrate a book with photos or drawings with a title like “My First Day of School.” Your child can answer any questions about the book you might ask.
    • Cut pictures from magazines or books. Make a chart on a piece of poster board, giving yourself a column for each of the “WH” questions (who, what, where, when, and why). Choose a picture and ask your child to place the picture in the correct column. For example, if you choose a picture of a person, your child should place the picture under the “who” column.
    • Help your child create their own questions using picture cards. Cut pictures from magazines or old books. Show your child a picture and say, “Ask me a question about this picture.” If you are showing your child “flowers,” he/she may ask, “Who gave you the flowers? Why did you get flowers? Where did your buy the flowers?”
    • Ask your child who, what, when, where, and why questions about a television show they are watching.
    • When cleaning up his/her room, have your child practice categorizing. Start by putting all the clothes into one pile. Next, collect everything that is blue. Go through the room until everything is put away.
    • Play a memory game about what happened in a movie or television show your child has watched. Have your child try to put the show’s events into the correct sequence.
    • Have your child predict the ending of a movie or television show.
    • Have your child describe the characters, setting, and/or events in a favorite movie or television show.
    • Sometimes, children with language impairments become intimidated when they are bombarded with questions. Try commenting on your child’s activity. For example, “You are drawing a big, red, round ball” or “Next, I think you will play with your yellow fire engine.”
    • Keep a calendar or journal with your child. Make your child aware of upcoming holidays, birthdays, or school events.
    • You are your child’s best language model. Encourage conversations that are age appropriate as well as polite.Listen to your child. Look at them when they talk to you. Give them time to respond.
    • Encourage your child to tell stories and talk about events.
    • Have your child select familiar objects from their room. Have your child tell you the name of the object, what it looks like, and how you use it.
    • Sing! Singing with your child can help him/her learn new vocabulary, use memory skills, practice listening skills, and develop expression of ideas with words.
    • Expand on your child’s utterances. For example, if your child says cereal, you can respond with “You want cereal.”
    • Repeat what your child says to show that you understand. Expand on what they said or revise the statement/question to make it correct.
    • Talk to your child about what you are doing as you are doing it.
    • Plan family activities. Discuss the plans with your child and have them predict what they will do and how they will feel.
    • Some children will benefit from using gestures along with words.
    • Make sure that you have your child's attention before you say something.
    • If you pause after speaking, your child will have a chance to continue the conversation.
    • Play a description game. Have your child identify what you are describing. For example, “It is warm, round, and full of chocolate chips.” (a cookie)
    • If your child stutters, make sure your family members aren’t competing for time to talk.
    • Use and define new vocabulary words.
    • Practice categorization in the home. Group 3 or 4 objects together, including one that does not belong. Have your child identify the object that does not belong and why. For example, a toothbrush, a towel, shampoo, and an apple.
    • Practice following 2 or 3-step directions. For example, “Go to your room and bring me your backpack.” or “Pick up your plate, empty it into the trash, and place it in the sink.” Encourage your child to give directions.
    • If your child stutters, talk about the stuttering in an accepting, encouraging way.
    • Let your child give the directions! Follow your child’s directions as he or she explains how to draw a picture, find a hidden object, or make something in the kitchen.
    • Have your child help prepare a snack. While in the kitchen, name the utensils you will need. Talk about the order of preparation. Talk about what the food tastes and smells like. Discuss where the food comes from? What does your child like or dislike?
    • If your child stutters, give them your attention and as much time as they need to talk.
    • Take your child to the grocery store. Before you go, prepare a list. You can work by categories such as vegetable or dairy. As you shop, discuss location of items in the store and describe the items by size, shape, color, weight, etc.
    • Create a scrapbook of your child’s favorite things. Group them into categories. For example, my favorite foods, my favorite places, my favorite toys, etc.
    • Play a yes-no game. Have your child answer simple questions you give them. For example, “Are you a boy?” “Can you fly?”
    • Ask open-ended questions that require your child to use more language. For example, instead of asking “Would you like a cookie?” you could ask “What would you like?”
    • Have your child re-tell stories or personal events.
    • If your child stutters, don’t set perfect speech as the goal. Reward more natural sounding speech, with less struggle and work.
    • Play concentration using cards that you have made yourself. Use pictures of new vocabulary words you are learning, match items that are in the same category, or pair questions with answers.
    • If your child stutters, talk to your child in a slow relaxed way.